• Presley Hager

FAST 5: Questions and Answers on Child Support

Updated: Sep 23

On July 1, 2020, Arkansas implemented its anticipated change in child-support guidelines. The new guidelines contain an entirely different model for calculating support payments. Below are five quick questions and answers to help you understand your obligations. At the end, we have linked to our summary of the new Administrative Order 10. If you have any questions that are not answered here or need to see how your child support order may change, contact Presley Hager for more information. You can email Presley at presley@davisfirmpllc.com or call 501.500.3320.


1. What model are the new child support guidelines based on?

The Income Shares Model is based on the idea that children should receive the same amount of parental income that they would have received if the parents stayed together.

2. What is child support gross income?

The gross income of a parent employed to full capacity or potential income if unemployed minus amounts for pre-existing child support obligations or for children not relayed to the current child support subject to the action of the court.

3. What does gross income not include?

· Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF)

· Supplemental Security Income (SSI) received for self or any child;

· Food Stamps and General Assistance;

· income derived by other household members;

· child support,

· adoption subsidy payments, and

· foster care board payments received for other children not involved in the case.

4. Are there any other costs associated with child support that I have to pay along with child support?

Yes. There are administrative costs that have to be paid to the Clerk of the Court or to the Arkansas Clearinghouse for administrative costs pursuant to Ark. Code Ann. § 9-12-312(e)(1)(A), § 9-10-109(b)(1)(A) and § 9-14-804(b) are not be included in the support amount. 

5. What if I’m incarcerated? Do I have to pay child support?

Pursuant to Act 904 of 2019, codified at Arkansas Code Annotated § 9-12-312(a), § 9-14-106(a), and § 9-14-107(a), the incarceration of a parent shall be treated as involuntary unemployment for the purpose of establishing or modifying an award of child support. Involuntary unemployment is not a cause for halting child support payments, so, yes, you still have to pay if you are incarcerated.

“Incarceration” means a conviction that results in a sentence of confinement to a local jail, state or federal correctional facility, or state psychiatric hospital for at least 180 days and excludes credit for time served before sentencing.

For more information, click below.

2020.07.06.ark.childsupport.new
.pdf
Download PDF • 182KB

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Presley Hager practices Family Law at the Davis Firm in Little Rock, Arkansas. Presley has a Juris Doctor from William H Bowen School of Law; a Masters of Public Administration from UA-Little Rock; and a bachelors degree in Social Work from the University of Little Rock. She is a licensed social worker and dependency-neglect certified. In addition to practicing law, Presley works to train other attorneys and judges to be trauma-informed in handling cases, clients, and witnesses. Presley Hager practices Family Law at the Davis Firm in Little Rock, Arkansas. Presley has a Juris Doctor from William H Bowen School of Law; a Masters of Public Administration from UA-Little Rock; and a bachelors degree in Social Work from the University of Little Rock. She is a licensed social worker and dependency-neglect certified. In addition to practicing law, Presley works to train other attorneys and judges to be trauma-informed in handling cases, clients, and witnesses.

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